Critters - Fauna

The Pond Beyond is home to many animal friends. Some of them live with us on our farm and we are their caretakers. Some of the animals live in the wild and don't need our help to survive- they just need us to take care of their habitat!

PUPS - CANIS LUPIS FAMILIARIS

Paddy (left) and Arlo (right). Our furry friends come in many shapes and sizes. Paddy is an English Colie, and Arlo is a Jack Russell Terrier. 

DONKEYS - EQUUS ASINUS

Shane (left) and Hody (right) are a pair of donkeys who live at the Pond and love to play, roll around in the mud, and run and chase each other.  

PACIFIC SLOPE FLYCATCHER - EMPIDONAX DIFFICILLIS

Don't feel bad if you aren't sure what this bird is right away- the name means "difficult flycatcher". These small birds eat insects and live in Washington during their breeding season. 

AMERICAN ROBINS - TURDUS MIGRATORIUS

These juvenile American Robins aren't quite ready to fledge, or fly from their nest, quite yet. Their grown-up feathers are still coming in. 

NORTH AMERICAN BEAVER-
CASTOR CANADENSIS

Beavers are industrious mammals who create elaborate living spaces called dams in which they live as a family unit. Beavers are primarily nocturnal and famously use their sharp elongated teeth to fell trees to use for their dams. 

HONEYBEE - APIS
 

Honeybees are industrious members of the insect world. They are the only insects that make food that can be eaten by humans. A honeybee travels over 500 miles to produce 1 pound of honey. They live in colonies and work all their lives for the good of their community of bees. Bees are endangered. You can help them by planting flowers in your garden at home!

AMERICAN BULLFROG-
RANA CATESBEIANA
 

The American Bullfrog is a member of the amphibian family. The bullfrog is an invasive species. They live in ponds, and near small bodies of water where they can grow to the size of a dinner plate. 

Plantlife - Fauna

Our Pacific Northwest home is a kaleidoscope of plant species! The Pond Beyond strives to allow native plants a place to flourish. We have myriad species including many coniferous (cone-bearing, evergreen trees) and deciduous trees (leaf-bearing trees). There are many wild flowers and shrubs that grow here as well. They help our natural ecosystem by providing homes for birds and animals, food for everyone who lives here, and pollen for the bugs and butterflies! 

ALDER FOREST - ALNUS

The Alder is a member of the birch tree family. It is a leafy tree. The Alder trees in Washington are typically Red Alder, the tallest/largest species of Alder in the world. They are a native plant. 

FOXGLOVE - DIGITALIS

Foxglove is a beautiful and prevalent flower all around the Pacific Northwest, but did you know it is very poisonous? You must never ingest any part of the foxglove plant. Foxglove blooms each year producing vibrant purple flowers. The flower was introduced from Europe to American gardens. 

WESTERN SWORDFERN -
POLYSTICHUM MUNITUM

The Swordfern is the most common fern in the Pacific Northwest and grows plentifully here at the Pond Beyond. It is an evergreen plant that reproduces using microscoptic spores. Look for the small round yellow-colored spores on the back of the fern fronds. 

PACIFIC RHODODENDRON -
RHODODENDRON MACROPHYLLUM

The Pacific rhododendron is a native Northwestern evergreen shrub which, in nature, has pinkish flowers. Rhododenrons have been cultivated for gardens in a rainbow of colors. These shrubs regularly grow to 20-30ft tall! The rhododendron is the state flower of Washington State. 

FIR TREE - ABIES

Several varieties of fir tree grow at the Pond Beyond including the Pacific Silver Fir, and the Douglas Fir which isn't actually a fir at all but its own special genus! These are examples of conifers, trees that bear cones (fir tree cones go up, pine tree cones point down) and have needles instead of leaves. Almost all conifers are green year round, that's why we call them Evergreens! 

CATMINT - NEPETA CATARIA

Catmint comes from the genus Anisomeles. It is an herb that grows well in Washington although it is native to warmer climates like China, India, Southeast Asia, and Madagascar. All the plants in this family have flowers. The Catmint has a minty fragrance, like many mint plants. It is edible and bees love it!